Arizona’s Leading Dermatology Center

Call Now: 480-899-7546

Se Habla Español

Skin Cancer


Skin Cancer Chandler AZ Dysplastic Nevi

Dysplastic Nevi, also known as a Nevus with Architectural Disorder, are associated with an increased risk of developing a Melanoma. Those who have been diagnosed with a Dysplastic Nevus are twice as likely of developing a melanoma than the general population. The risk increases to 14 times as likely in those with 10 or more abnormal moles. The current risk of developing Melanoma in the USA is 1 in 75 people. These lesions are of concern because Melanoma is the most serious skin cancer and can be life threatening.

Dysplastic Nevi are a growth of abnormal cells. The more abnormal the changes in the mole, the higher the risk of developing a melanoma.

Treatment

Treatment for severely Dysplastic Nevi is surgical removal. The doctor may suggest removing more of the normal skin around the mole if the changes were very irregular.

Prevention

  1. Do a monthly self skin examination.
  2. If you notice any change notify your provider for advice as soon as possible.
  3. Wear protective clothing, sunscreen and observe the sun protective guidelines.
  4. A Dermatologist should examine all of your skin every 3-6 months the first year, every 6-12 month the second year, and yearly thereafter.
  5. Have your Eye Doctor routinely check eye grounds for moles.
  6. Have your Dentist to routinely check your mouth for suspicious lesions.
  7. Women, have your OB/GYN routinely check for moles in the vaginal area.
  8. Have family members (parents, siblings, children) checked for moles. They are at increased risk of developing Dysplastic Nevi and Melanoma because you have had one.

For further information you may contact the:

American Academy of Dermatology
P.O. Box 4014
Schaumburg, IL 60168-4014
1-888-462-3376
www.aad.org

Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer. Chronic sun exposure is the cause in over 95% of cases. That would explain why it is more common past the age of 40.

BCC usually starts as a small shiny bump on sun exposed skin, such as the head, neck, or hands. Sometimes it can be found on the back or shoulders. When left untreated the bump may crust over or bleed. It can grow slowly and does not normally spread to other parts of the body.

There are five typical characteristics of skin cancer and they are all quite different from each other. If you observe any of the following warning signs (or other changes in your skin) be sure to consult your Dermatologist. The five warning signs are:

An open sore that bleeds, oozes, or crusts and remains open for three or more weeks. A reddish patch or irritated area. It may sometimes crust over, itch, or hurt. At other times there may be no discomfort. A smooth growth with an elevated border and a dimpled center with blood vessels at the surface. A shiny bump or nodule that may be pearly. It is often pink, red, or white. Rarely, it may appear tan, black, or brown. A scar-like area that may be white or yellow and the skin may appear shiny or taught. Treatment usually consists of surgical removal using a scraping instrument called a curette, followed by application of a special electric current to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Even though the BCC has been removed, another growth can develop in the same place or in a nearby area.

Regular follow-up with your Dermatologist and your Primary Care/Family Physician is most important in order to check for recurrence and for new lesions. An annual physical exam and chest x-ray may be indicated. Be sure to keep your regular follow-up appointment because the best treatment for skin cancer is early detection and prevention.

Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC)

Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common form of skin cancer. Chronic sun exposure is often the cause. However, it can occur spontaneously with no known cause. A skin condition called Actinic Keratosis can lead to SCC.

SCC usually starts on sun-exposed skin, such as the head, ears, or hands. Sometimes it can be found on the back or shoulders. When left untreated it may crust over or bleed. It can grow slowly and has potential to spread if left uncontrolled.

There are five typical characteristics of skin cancer and they are all quite different from each other. If you observe any of the following warning signs (or other changes in your skin) be sure to consult your Dermatologist. The five warning signs are:

  1. An open sore that bleeds, oozes, or crusts and remains open for three or more weeks.
  2. A reddish patch or irritated area. It may sometimes crust over, itch, or hurt. At other times there may be no discomfort.
  3. A smooth growth with an elevated border and a dimpled center with blood vessels at the surface.
  4. A shiny bump or nodule that may be pearly. It is often pink, red, or white. Rarely, it may appear tan, black, or brown.
  5. A scar-like area that may be white or yellow and the skin may appear shiny or taught.

Treatment usually consists of surgical removal using a scraping instrument called a curette, followed by application of a special electric current to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Even though the SCC has been removed, another growth can develop in the same place or in a nearby area.

Regular follow-up with your Dermatologist and your Primary Care/Family Physician is most important in order to check for recurrence and for new lesions. An annual physical exam and chest x-ray may be indicated. Be sure to keep your regular follow-up appointment because the best treatment for skin cancer is early detection and prevention.

Keratoacanthoma

A keratoacanthoma, or a KA, is a lesion that contains keratin. It may look like a red or pink volcano growing on the skin. A KA is considered a form of squamous cell carcinoma. Some KA's are considered non-malignant and will resolve, usually within two or three months. KA's that continue to grow and spread, should be treated aggressively as a squamous cell carcinoma. If your lesion does not resolve, it will need to be treated surgically or with topical chemicals.

Two Convenient Locations


Skin and Cancer Center of Arizona
725 South Dobson Road, Suite 200
Chandler, Arizona 85224
Tel: 480-899-7546
Fax: 480 899-7599




Skin and Cancer Center of Arizona
21321 E. Ocotillo Rd., Suite 124
Queen Creek, AZ 85142
Tel: 480-899-7546
Fax: 480 899-7599

Join Skin and Cancer Center of Arizona on FacebookFollow  TwitterPinterest
AADAADAADAADAADAAD
Top